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All Campbell School Districts Raise Their API Scores

Moreland School District had the highest jump, raising its API by 11 points to 885, 85 points higher than the state benchmark.

The California Academic Performance Index base report was released Thursday morning and overall, Santa Clara County schools, including Campbell did very well.

The API is a tool that the state uses in order to rate a school's performance on scale of 200 to 1,000. California's benchmark, or expected average is 800.

Campbell Union School District had eight schools out of its 12 schools hit this statewide benchmark, with Rosemary Elementary being the newest to this group.

The county office said the results also show a trend of higher performance among a broad range of schools in the county, for tests that were taken by students last spring. About 68 percent of county schools met or exceeded the statewide performance target of 800 for the 2011 Base API. That compares with 50 percent statewide.

Campbell Union School District overall raised its API score by 5 points, from 834 to 839. The highest API score goes to Marshall Lane Elementary, with a score of 958 and the lowest API score goes to Campbell Middle School, with a score of 752.

The biggest jump goes to Rosemary Elementary, which raised its API score from 772 to 812--a 40-point jump. The biggest drop happened at Sherman Oaks School, whose API score fell from 845 to 827--an 18-point drop.

 

School

2009

2010

2011

2012

+/-

Blackford Elementary

714 767 763 759 -4 Capri Elementary 831 872 867 862 -5 Castlemont Elementary 795 810 824 827 +3 Forest Hill Elementary 909 918 931 948 +17 Lynhaven Elementary 791 773 801 790 -11 Marshall Lane Elementary 928 959 953 958 +5 Rosemary Elementary 734 760 772 812 +40 Sherman Oaks 742 830 845 827 -18 Village School 919 933 951 946 -5 Campbell Middle School 727 728 737 752 +15 Monroe Middle School 736 778 779 790 +11 Rolling Hills Middle School 902 917 909 910 +1

In Moreland School District, five out of six schools raised their total API. All schools within this district hit the statewide benchmark.

The district overall raised its API by 11 points, from 874 to 885. The highest API score goes to Country Lane School, with a score of 949 and the lowest API score goes to Anderson Elementary, with a score of 817.

The biggest jump goes to Baker Elementary, which raised its API from 904 to 929--a 25-point jump.

School

2009

2010

2011

2012

+/-

Country Lane

918 941 950 949 -1 Easterbrook Discovery 849 871 867 875 +8 Payne Elementary 818 876 882 897 +15 Baker Elementary 901 905 904 929 +25 Anderson Elementary 810 810 816 817 +1 Moreland Middle School 768 843 850 865 +15

In Campbell Union High School District, all schools raised their total API but only Leigh High School made the state benchmark.

The district overall raised its API by 6 points, from 772 to 778. The highest API score goes to Leigh High School, with a score of 819 and the lowest API score goes to Del Mar High School, with a score of 703.

The biggest jump goes to Westmont High School, which raised its API from 787 to 795--an 8-point jump.

School

2009

2010

2011

2012

+/-

Branhamn HS

774

781 797 799 +2 Del Mar HS 680 701 718 703 -15 Leigh HS 801 817 822 819 -3 Prospect HS 739 755 771 775 +4 Westmont HS 763 778

787

795 +8

*All API score information gathered from the California Department of Education's website.

 

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Mayra Flores de Marcotte October 11, 2012 at 07:02 PM
Congratulations to all our Campbell schools and all those behind the scenes making a difference (you know who you are).
Atul Nayak October 12, 2012 at 02:24 AM
Well done Campbell schools! I am glad I moved into this District.
David October 12, 2012 at 04:12 AM
Come on Prospect....lets get over the 800 mark so area home prices will rise and at least be somewhat comparable to Lynrbook, Monta Vista, and Saratoga!! Lets go Prospect....!
Mayra Flores de Marcotte October 12, 2012 at 04:15 AM
Prospect is so close too! 25 points can definitely be achieved. :)
David October 12, 2012 at 04:29 AM
Do you know why this is happening? The Moreland School District is so good...but why aren't the majority of academically excelled students attending Prospect? I know so many parents including myself...we are sad to leave Moreland schools after the middle schools and we send our children to Cupertino, Lynbrook, Monta Vista...just so we can avoid Prospect. This is unfortunate as many families are not able to afford $1M homes to afford to attend those top tier schools even though they are literally one mile away from Prospect.
Blokes October 12, 2012 at 06:59 AM
Our eldest is a senior at Prospect and has done very well in all the 4 APs he took last year and did very well in his SAT and SAT 2. A bunch of his friends are with him in that range. Their personal API scores rival those of some "sub groups" in the Cupertino schools. Therefore, it is not the school. It is how motivated the student is. The staff needs to come up with innovative ways to engage their students- especially the less motivated ones to excel.
Mayra Flores de Marcotte October 12, 2012 at 07:12 PM
David, the API score is only one of the several ways that schools are ranked. And now to play a little bit of devil's advocate … Why did you choose not to send your children to Prospect? Schools are made up of administrators and educators, parents and community. It's been seen that when everyone works collaboratively, like at Rosemary School and several schools in the Moreland School District, results are seen. I have covered education for the last seven years in Silicon Valley and I've seen students achieve at schools like Prospect (http://patch.com/A-hVfs) and schools like Monta Vista. Just from what I've heard and seen, it not only occurs with educational support but also parental support and the desire to achieve. Another thought. What if all those that leave for other schools instead of staying at their local school actually attended their designated school? Would it make a difference? What if their desire to succeed academically rubbed off on their peers and energized their educators? What if their parents' passion and involvement in their education rubbed off on other parents? Those schools may end up becoming the next high-achieving schools, and in turn, home prices in their community may rise. These are all, of course, just thoughts to keep the conversation going. What do you think?
David October 12, 2012 at 09:32 PM
Mayra, excellent questions! Answering your question based on my experiences and parents that have done the same thing. I have children that graduated from Prospect, 01 and Lynbrook, 05. Why did you choose not to send your children to Prospect? Schools are made up of administrators and educators, parents and community. -1. We (my wife and I) felt that the parents and community are not strong enough. The parents and community at that exclusive side of West San Jose (95129 with Cupertino Schools) have a better education environment since most of the parents are highly educated that work at professional jobs in the Valley. -2. More AP, Honor Courses, and after school activities offered than Prospect. -3. The academic environment and professional network are better. Those students that graduated from undergrad are pursuing graduate degrees such as MBA, Law, Medical, etc. and working at some top companies in the region. -4. At the end of the day, the socio-demographics of the community make up the performance of the school (another good example is Mission San Jose High School in the Missions part of Fremont).
David October 12, 2012 at 09:33 PM
I have covered education for the last seven years in Silicon Valley and I've seen students achieve at schools like Prospect (http://patch.com/A-hVfs) and schools like Monta Vista. -There will always be exceptions at every school. The answers I am providing are about the majority of the student body at a particular campus. -When MV/Lynbrook each sends around 40 students to Berkeley and 40 students to UCLA compared to around 7 students to Berkeley from Prospect, then I believe the school environment is better at those high schools.
David October 12, 2012 at 09:33 PM
Another thought. What if all those that leave for other schools instead of staying at their local school actually attended their designated school? Would it make a difference? What if their desire to succeed academically rubbed off on their peers and energized their educators? What if their parents' passion and involvement in their education rubbed off on other parents? Those schools may end up becoming the next high-achieving schools, and in turn, home prices in their community may rise. -Excellent points. If you check the API scores in the early 2000s, Cupertino HS used to be ranked well below Homestead, Lynbrook, and MV. I have many parents that moved a couple of blocks away so the children can attend Lynbrook and not Cupertino. Besides the reason many more educated families are moving into Cupertino HS boundary, many students are choosing to attend Cupertino HS after graduating from Hyde Middle School. In fewer than 10 years, you see Cupertino HS skyrocketed in the latest API scores and many of the reasons are the questions you posed. -You can see in the real estate of Moreland Schools, many more educated parents are moving into the areas which are pushing up home prices (Country Lane Elementary School area is a good example). Let’s just hope they will eventually attend the local designated high schools…. I wish the best of luck to the new generation of parents and students that will make Prospect better!
David October 12, 2012 at 09:35 PM
Blokes, best of luck to your child when your child applies to college!
Mayra Flores de Marcotte October 12, 2012 at 10:54 PM
Thanks for keeping the conversation going, David! I appreciate your comments (and hope our readers do too). You bring up really great points. Again, playing devil's advocate here, if socio-demographics play such a huge part in what a school's climate will be like (and subsequent success), should district busing come back and replace neighborhood schools, so as to evenly distribute the students that fall under those subgroups rather than having them all in a single (underperforming/struggling) school? Or should they stay segregated by economics so that parents will know what school to avoid? As to parents and community not being enough, isn't this the purpose of school boards (to allow parents and community members to take a more active role in shaping and implementing school policy)? Also, should a school's success be based on acceptance rate to prestigious colleges or college acceptance in general? There's no doubt that UC Berkeley and UCLA are fantastic schools but isn't it true that college is what you make of it? There are many well-known professionals that have paved the way in their fields that come from state schools, such as San Jose State University: http://www.sjsu.edu/about_sjsu/history/alumni/ (and I know, I do have a bias since I graduated from SJSU). This is a great topic to discuss. Thanks for being an active participant in the conversation.
David October 12, 2012 at 11:36 PM
Or should they stay segregated by economics so that parents will know what school to avoid? -That would be controversial, but as a parent and not some kind of education activist, I wouldn't mind that proposal. Also, should a school's success be based on acceptance rate to prestigious colleges or college acceptance in general? -It shouldn't solely be based on those criteria, but in my opinion, those are some of the main driving forces including high standardized test scores and preparation for college. There are many well-known professionals that have paved the way in their fields that come from state schools, such as San Jose State University -Of course, it doesn't mean if you attend Stanford, you are going to guarantee to make $200K. Surrounding yourself in better environments, schools, etc. will increase your percentage of success...and add in some luck. My wife attended SJSU...go Spartans! Thanks for the awesome article!
Mayra Flores de Marcotte October 12, 2012 at 11:42 PM
Thanks for the awesome conversation! I think opening things up for debate, important things like education, is key to broadening your understanding on the subject. That and you never know who's quietly reading along ... Looking forward to your comments on other articles. :)
Blokes October 20, 2012 at 12:35 AM
David- Thanks for your wishes. The basic theme of the above discussion can be simplified into two categories of people- those who choose to be the change they wish to see and those who want others to work on the changes they wish to see. These two main groups are defined primarily by the amount of time, energy and effort they are willing to put in to see the change through.

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